Web Directions Unplugged, day one thoughts.

I don’t think I’m going to use the word, “mobile” anymore.

I just don’t think it’s an accurate description of what’s going on. Laptops are mobile. So are tablets. Phones are inherently mobile. It just seems that mobile is redundant at this point, and it doesn’t seem an appropriate portrayal of all of this.

I think it’s better if we all just agree to use the phrase, “device development”. That’s what we’re talking about, right? We’re talking about Galaxy Tabs, Blackberry Playbooks, iPads, Xooms, GoogleTVs, a host of smartphones… the only constants seem to be, A) they have screens, B) they have browsers, and C) they have network connections. They all seems to implement some kind of “App Store”, but the implementations vary. Native Apps seem like a perilous journey, as you’re hitching your horse to a chosen cart. Granted if it’s an Apple cart, your chances seem pretty safe, but what about the rest of the world? Are you comfortable making that choice for a client? Or worse, are you comfortable selling a client on a “multiple native app strategy”?

I spent lunch chatting with a nice gentleman from a very large global airline. His airline has an iOS app. They’ve also got an Android app… and a Blackberry App. He oversees three different teams of developers all with different skillsets that he has to somehow manage and maintain. He’s got a creeping codebase, and from the top, he’s getting pressure on the cost of this whole endeavor. He was in the middle of an epiphany that was fun to watch. He realized, “you know, none of our apps rely on any particular native feature. We’re not using geolocation yet (they plan to down the road, but it’s not something that’s high on his list of “wants” right now) and there’s nothing in our app that couldn’t be replaced by HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery Mobile.” So now he’s rethinking their whole mobile strategy, and I gotta tell ya, I was right there with him.

I’ve said before, I don’t think these technologies are going to replace native app development by any means, and let’s be clear, Apple has a huge… we’re talking giant, interest in keeping native apps at the forefront. They’ll (rightfully) point out that there is a lot of things that Web Apps simply can’t do and for speed, games, graphics acceleration, animation, etc, native apps will always “win”.

See, that’s awesome… if I needed that stuff. But I don’t… really, and there’s the rub. I could take care of my current (and future) clients’ needs with about 99.9% of the features that a web app exposes… and I’d be doing them a service (I think). One codebase, a consistent UI, an effective experience. What’s not to love?

I spent today seeing example after example of open, standard, solutions to the need to create a consistent experience across multiple devices, and I’ve been convinced. I think we’re at a real watershed moment in the development for all these screens and I’m happy to see that the maturity of these tools has allowed such a large and diverse group of developers and designers to move forward in this way. HTML, CSS, Javascript (jQuery)… these are well known, ubiquitous, mature, robust languages and the community has really demonstrated beyond a shadow of a doubt (at least to me) that the future of mobile hasn’t been written just yet.

Whoops! I mean, “the future of device development hasn’t been written just yet…”.

It’ll take some time… old habits die hard, right?

2 Replies to “Web Directions Unplugged, day one thoughts.”

  1. Just a comment to the “hitching your horse up to one cart” with Apple being the possible exception…. take a look at iFlowReader’s website, http://www.iflowreader.com.

    Yeah, its an example from a very specific vertical market, but it certainly reinforces my fear of being tied directly to one platform.

    1. Yeah, I saw that earlier in the week. Isn’t that sad? The great thing about all these technologies is that they still totally work on iOS as well as working on Android, RIM, etc. This has been a great conference so far, and it came at a perfect time for me. I was looking to get into iOS and Objective C, but I never had any time (kids and life) and had an even harder time trying to come up with something to work on in a vacuum. I never had clients coming to me looking for iOS apps specifically (which really should’ve been the first hint, right?). However, I did have a lot of opportunity to get into jQuery Mobile, and I quickly fell in love with it. Further digging into mobile browser capabilities inspired me to get deeper into HTML5 and CSS3, which I had been sort of wading into. Then along comes Dreamweaver CS 5.5 and I felt like the planets were aligning. Spending time at this conference has really given me the confidence that this is a really viable direction to go in. Maybe the next time you’re in town we can sit down and really talk about it!

Leave a Reply