The most difficult book I ever tried to obtain (so far…).

Dead 'til Proven Alive!


Jumping on the "Paul is Dead" bandwagon.

I don’t understand it. For the last couple of years I’ve concentrated almost solely on Bronze Age Batmans. Specifically, Batmans from around issue 200 to 251. This represents, in my opinion, the best example of “modern Batman” there is. Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams’ excellent “re-imagining” of the “Dark Knight Detective”. The re-introduction of Two-Face, Ra’s Al Ghul and Talia, the League of Assassins, a much more sinister and menacing Joker. All happened in the pages of Batman and Detective during the early 70s, coming on the heels of the campy 60s TV show and taking the character back to “his roots”, so to speak.

Slowly (and somewhat meticulously) I’ve been putting together what I consider fairly nice quality examples of those books. Some, like issues 232 and 234, have understandably been a bit difficult to locate and acquire for a moderate sum. Others have been pretty easy to locate. I was actually a little surprised that so many copies of issue 200 in high grade were available, which was pleasant considering it meant that the price would be appropriately kind.

But the one that just out and out shocked me was issue 222. It’s a Beatles parody issue, playing off the “Paul is Dead” urban legend started around 1969. Overstreet lists an 8.0 copy at around $35, however, that’s perhaps the most underrated price I’ve ever come across. I can tell you from personal experience, having watched every single one that’s gone on sale on eBay for the last two years that it’s going for multiples of that, unslabbed. Slabbed copies have gone for upwards of $2,000. It’s not just the price either, it’s the demand. I recently (two night ago) won a nice looking copy after trying unsuccessfully at least 50 to 60 times. The bidding on this is outrageous… and heated. I put in a bid in the last 10 seconds of a copy and as soon as I hit submit, my ultimately winning bid was immediately my maximum bid. Not a penny less. I was stunned. Moreso because I actually won the damn thing.

But it’s crazy how many people bid on this book and the prices it ultimately goes for. For the first time I started to wonder just how accurate Overstreet really is, after all.